Attendees during the evening festivities at the Boma France Campfire.

Attendees during the evening festivities at the Boma France Campfire.

Photo credit: Boma France

The Most Thought-Provoking Quotes from the Boma France Campfire

From new forms of artificial intelligence to new forms of energy. From climate change to sociopolitical change. Our world is transforming in a multitude of ways. In order to successfully navigate through this highly uncertain world, we will need new kinds of conversations — one that accounts for all the converging vectors of change and where these vectors of change are taking us. The only way to secure the comprehensive dialog that is needed is with a plurality of voices and perspectives. The Boma France Campfire recently attempted to tackle this challenge.

The event united over 200 researchers, policymakers, and experts from a number of industries with forward thinking citizens. It was an event that attempted to combine the best in global thinking with the best in local insight to begin the conversations that we need to have in order to adapt and thrive in th world of tomorrow.

Here, we curated some of the most intriguing quotes and questions to come from this dialog.

  • A group of individuals sit in chairs and couches talking with one another at the Boma France Campfire.
    Participants at the Boma France Campfire gather at the start of the day Photo Credit: Boma France
  • “The Stone Age didn’t end because they ran out of stones. It ended because better technologies were developed. Likewise, the age of fossil fuel won’t end because we run out of oil and coal. But because we have set out to replace fossil technologies with emission-free ones.” – Kasper Moth-Poulsen. Professor, Chalmers University of Technology
  • “What we are slowly coming to realize is that many of the tech companies we all worships are not sophisticated enough to understand the impact of what they are doing — of their long-term consequences for humanity, our way of life, and our ultimate happiness” – Lara Stein. CEO, Boma
  • “Bionic organs are still considered futuristic things, but I truly believe that, in 50 years, people will be walking around with different bionic organs that can provide regulation over their function, and even endow them with enhanced capabilities. It’s not science fiction. It’s science, and it’s happening right now.” – Tal Dvir. Professor, TAU's School of Molecular Cell Biology and Biotechnology
  • In the coming years, we are going to need to consider creating a digital Geneva Convention. – Caroline Brandao. Head of the International Humanitarian Law, French Red Cross
  • “For me, governments are faced with a choice: Either they ignore the problems and the dissatisfaction, encouraging the emergence of new autonomous territories that arise as potential replacements and compete externally with them, or they take hold of his desire for change, creating new spaces, new temporary autonomous zones to encourage the experimentation of new governance models, which can then be smoothly re-integrated into existing models…possibly for the good of all.” – Primavera de Filippi. Associate Researcher, Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
  • “The principle of humanity is a natural one. It is compassion, mutual aid, the gesture towards the other to rescue, to protect them.” – Caroline Brandao. Head of the International Humanitarian Law, French Red Cross
  • The ecological case for mining platinum on asteroids is just as important as the economical one: we’re ruining our planet, and asteroid mining is offering us a way out. – Mitch Hunter-Scullion. Founder and CEO, Asteroid Mining Corporation
  • “Imagine a beautiful city surrounded by a river and a wall. In this city, there are fires. If you are near a fire, it is easy to put it out or even repair what’s causing the fire damage. Except that you don't have the ability to be in the city. You are outside it. Today, there are two ways to extinguish the fires. Either you cause a flood in the city, with the disastrous consequences it entails, or you break through the city walls and destroy everything in your path to reach the fire and put it out. This city is the human brain. What we are doing is creating a method that allows us to move around using the streets and put out the fire where it is, and only where it is. To do this, we created a submillimeter robot.” – Bertrand Duplat. CEO, Robeauté
  • “If it's so complicated to find space on Earth, why not go into space? Could we seize new territories in Earth's orbit in order to create a new nation?” – Primavera de Filippi. Associate Researcher, Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

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